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Carl Little

Contributing Editor

The complex relationship between an artist and an ardent admirer: collector Susan Myers and painter Paul Rickert.
Alexandra Tyng finds inspiration for her paintings by looking at the landscape from the air.
A handful of Maine artists have left legacies to promote future artists.
From lively narratives to stylized landscapes, downeast painter Philip Barter is a Maine master.
Water is a vital element for painter Marguerite Robichaux, a seasoned fly fisher who often combines painting and fishing trips, who captures the rivers and lakes of Maine.
Cynthia Stroud creates bronze bears, painted boats, and more in her Brooklin, Maine, studio..
At 93, artist and author Ashley Bryan is still hard at work. His newest children’s book, Freedom Over Me, tells the story of slaves.
American impressionist painter Childe Hassam spent many summers painting on Appledore Island, producing some of his most wonderful work.
Painter John Moore assembles many parts on the canvas to create a layered and compelling whole.
Carl Little reflects on modern artists whose and the memories their work evokes.
Maine artist Barbara Sullivan puts a contemporary twist on the age-old art of fresco work.
Artist Ed Nadeau taps into his Franco-American heritage and a sense of Maine to create stories of life lived near the edge. In the spectrum of Maine artists, Nadeau is something of a rarity: a narrative painter who mixes fact and fiction. Many of his canvases conjure stories, some drawn from family and personal experiences, others “ripped from the headlines.”
Painter Joel Babb is a consummate realist. His landscapes of Boston, sometimes based on photographs and sketches made from the air or tall buildings, are considered among the finest achievements of their kind. In recent years, he has turned this same attention to detail onto natural settings in Maine.
The 2014-2015 Farnsworth Art Museum in Rockland’s exhibit “The Shakers: From Mount Lebanon to the World,” featured works from the Shaker Museum Mount Lebanon, the Sabbathday Lake Shaker Village, and several major museums. Some 200 objects were on display, including the minimalist furniture, boxes, and other household items for which the Shakers are renowned.
Celeste Roberge, a Maine sculptor whose work can be found in major collections across the country, explores the world, looking for inspiration in the environment. When she finds it, there is no telling how it will eventually manifest itself in her art, which, while conceptual, also is tangible, engaging, and provocative. Art writer Carl Little takes a look at her work with seaweed.
Artists are turning to science as a way to enhance their personal vision and to help explain the forces affecting our world.
World-famous photographer Eliot Porter honed his eye in Maine on a Penobscot Bay island owned by his family. His book, Summer Island: Penobscot Country, was published 50 years ago, but the essays and images remain incredibly relevant today.
Maine may not be the first place that comes to mind when thinking of African-American artists. Yet a number of eminent black artists have found a home and inspiration here, including David Driskell.
Writer Carl Little and his family live near the shores of Mt. Desert Island’s Echo Lake, a constant source of awe and inspiration.
Artist Sally Brun has met and befriended legendary figures in literature and art. At the same time, she represents that artist one finds in so many corners of Maine. Personal renown is less important than friends and family.
Inspired by a love of Maine and the outdoors, painter Jessica Ives records outdoor experiences—swimmers cutting across the water, a surfer bearing his board toward the waves, snowboarders resting on the slopes, a man casting a fly over a river.
Artist Dan West has taken skills he learned as a boatbuilder to make whimsical and timeless sculptures.
Painter Tollef Runquist’s colorful canvases draw on place and experience. Recently he has been inspired by his son’s playthings.
She may be 99, but Stell Shevis, master enamellist and life-long artist, continues to look for new experiences and creative outlets.
The New-York Historical Society has sent an impressive array of its marine and maritime art holdings, mostly 19th century, to the Portland Museum Art for the 2014-2015 winter season. “The Coast & the Sea: Marine and Maritime Art in America” offers an excellent opportunity to take in a clutch of sea-going artifacts, plus ships, seascapes, and portraits by a top-notch lineup of painters.