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Harbors

Stonington

Stonington, one of Maine’s busiest fishing ports, is a great place to visit, as long as you are not expecting a polished resort town.

Autumn Endings & Beginnings

Fall in Maine doesn’t have to mean the end of the boating season. Just sail farther south.

Fishing’s Future?

Aquaculture start-ups find a world-class research hub in rural Maine.

Emptying the Harbor

It’s a yearly ritual each fall: the harbor empties as Castine hunkers down for winter.

Way Back When 147 — Summer Colonies

Bayville in East Boothbay was one of many post-Civil War summer colonies in Maine.

Back When “Working Waterfront” Meant Just That

Photojournalists preserved these scenes from the midcoast Maine working waterfront during the 1940s through 1970s.

Navigating with an Old Salt

In the annals of colorful sailors, the late Lou Holladay of Boothbay ranks right up there with the saltiest of them. During his long life, he was an ocean sailor, chemical engineer, yacht-design consultant, bridge player, and competitive tennis player, and then he ran a small charter outfit.

Joel White

Reminiscences about Joel White, the man and the his designs.

Winter Harbor

Winter Harbor is called Acadia’s quiet side, but there’s a lot more going on than you might expect.

Stairs Mastered

The problem: a steep cliff with 52 steps. The solution: an automated tram that carries people and cargo with the push of a button.

Summer Camp Life

Two early summer camps in Maine.

Sabbathday Lake

Known for the nearby Shaker Village, Sabbathday Lake is worth a visit for its low-key boating and a great snack bar.

Up to Camp

“Up to camp” is a sacred concept. When you go, you pack the good stuff (fishing tackle and beer) in, and leave the bad stuff (pretty much everything else) behind.

Ice Age Survivors

When the last of the glaciers left by the ice age finally disappeared more than 10,000 years ago, they cleared the way for two evolutionary wonders of the animal kingdom: landlocked salmon and arctic char.

The Legend of White Nose Pete

Brook trout measured in pounds rather than inches are not uncommon in the Rangeley Lakes Region of western Maine, but there is one fish that stands out above all the rest. He is called White Nose Pete, although some refer to this piscatorial desperado as Pin Cushion Pete.