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Harbors

Rusticating up to Camp

Back in the late 1800s, summer people coming to Maine called themselves rusticators. But natives rusticated too, going “up to” camps on remote lakes like East Grand on the Canadian border.

Water Wings Not Included

People are drawn to Maine's whitewater rafting trips for the adventure and to be surrounded by nature. The river guides are key to the success of these expeditions, as the author learns on an eventful rafting trip.

Lakeside Yachting

Yacht clubs on Androscoggin, Cobbosseecontee, and Moosehead lakes date back to the early 1900s and the days of the freshwater rusticators.

Oh the Loons

Loons are a triple-threat in the bird world: they are stunning to look at, possess a supernatural voice, and are skilled predators of fish. Their presence on a lake means it is healthy.

Rangeley Lakes Camps

The earliest Rangeley Lakes recreational establishments were fishing clubs, where members had access to rustic accommodations and to guides. Then came resort hotels. These offered a more genteel experience, but also focused on outdoor activities and appreciation of nature.

Calling At Ash Island For Mixed Cargo

A beachcombing excursion to Ash Island in a tiny canoe.

Cruising Moosehead

Moosehead Lake is 40 miles long and makes a great cruising destination if you have a small sailboat that can be launched from a trailer.

A Whale of a Time

Boston Whalers, lobsterboats, and highlights from the 2015 Maine Boats, Homes & Harbors Show.

Eagle Island

Eagle Island in Casco Bay has some nice hiking trails as well as the former summer home of Arctic explorer Robert Peary.

Dr. Gould’s Flying Nurses

Rockland physician Dr. Edwin Gould used homing pigeons to communicate with his patients on Penobscot Bay islands, where telephones did not yet exist.

Did you know you can spend the night at a Maine lighthouse?

Maine lighthouses that you can visit, and perhaps even spend the night.

Beyond the Black Lines

Open water swimming has seen a surge in popularity recently, especially in Maine. Long-time swimmer Hodding Carter explains why.