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Harbors

A Race Back in Time

Novelist Alice Greenway sailed a leg in the first-ever Black Sea Tall Ships Regatta last spring. Along with Greenway, the crew of the 170-foot Kaliakra included twenty-five Bulgarian maritime high school students, two teachers, and a dozen seamen.

Cold Enough Yet? See the sea smoke

North Atlantic fishermen called it white frost or black frost. It is common in polar regions (where it is called Arctic sea smoke), but can form over any body of water if conditions are right. Catherine Schmitt explains the science of the winter phenomenon known as sea smoke.

Lettercutters

As letter carvers, the bulk of the work of the father-daughter team of Douglas M. Coffin Lettercutter is creating headstones—beautiful, hand-carved life markers with letters that flow into each other, creating words that call out to be read. They consider their work to be among the most caring of human endeavors.

MJM: Mary Johnstone's Motorboat

When J/Boats’ Bob Johnstone set out to build a new powerboat for his wife, Mary, he turned to fellow sailors to make it a reality. The result was a fresh take on what makes a good powerboat: the MJM 34z, the first in a series of successful motoryachts for MJM Yachts.

Art Flotilla

Celeste Roberge, a Maine sculptor whose work can be found in major collections across the country, explores the world, looking for inspiration in the environment. When she finds it, there is no telling how it will eventually manifest itself in her art, which, while conceptual, also is tangible, engaging, and provocative. Art writer Carl Little takes a look at her work with seaweed.

Gray Seals Swim Back Into Maine

By the late 1960s, gray seals in New England were confined to a handful of isolated colonies. Seeing one was rare, akin to spotting one of the other now-recovered species, such as bald eagles or osprey. Their rescue was the result of the 1972 Marine Mammal Protection Act, and today, Penobscot Bay’s Seal Island is home to one of the East Coast’s largest colonies.

FDR's Beloved Island

Franklin Delano Roosevelt was happiest on Campobello Island, which straddles the border between Maine and Canada. The 50th anniversary of Roosevelt-Campobello International Park, the centerpiece of which is the former first family’s 34-room, red-shingled summer “cottage,” was in 2014.

Tiny Houses

Whether they’re small, spare, and bare as a doghouse, or decorated with animal bones or lace curtains with ribbon ties, Maine ice shacks have a little something for everyone. Some people use them just for fishing; others use them as a winter clubhouse.

Small Adventures: Damariscotta Lake

Damariscotta Lake offers plenty of great boating opportunities.

Small Adventures: Tenants Harbor

A comfortable day's cruise from Camden or Boothbay Harbor, Tenants Harbor is an appealing Saturday-night stopover for weekend sailors.

Right-Sized Boating

The concept of the tiny home has become a hot new architectural phenomenon. But it's nothing new to someone who has lived on a small boat. The question is how do you decide whether a boat is too big or too small?

Schooner Rebirth

Maine's passenger windjammer fleet is finding new life as two of the classic vessels get refurbished and skippers find new ways to market schooner cruises.

Mysterious Predators

Sharks play an important role in ecosystem maintenance. We take a look at the eight species found in the Gulf of Maine.

Phippsburg

Phippsburg: a scenic peninsula that boasts a magnificent beach, a hidden hurricane hole ringed by a nature preserve, and a resort where mooring rental includes access to golf, dining, and a spa.

Frequent Fliers

Arctic terns migrate thousands of miles each year between Maine and the Arctic, but the route they travel is far from direct.